Home Accessibility Tax Credit

The Home Accessibility Tax Credit is a non-refundable federal tax credit of 15%, for expenditures made to a maximum of $10,000 on home renovations made to an eligible dwelling that improve accessibility, mobility or security for a senior or a person with disabilities.

Do keep all supporting documents and receipts as Canada Revenue Agency may ask for review to validate amount claimed.   Details of the tax credit and its eligibility click here.

It appears the same expenditures may also qualify as medical expenses if they qualify.

And for BC residents … you’ll probably also benefit from the provincial Home Renovations Tax Credit of 10% for the same expenditures, as mentioned in my earlier blog from November, 2016.

Truly a rare occurrence on spending where you may potentially have a triple win from the taxman!

Emergency fund primer

The need for an emergency fund is essential and cannot be overemphasized.

This fund should be in very liquid form and can be readily accessible.

So how much should be set aside for emergency living expenses?   Financial experts all agree it needs to be a minimum of 3 months’ worth, increasing to as many as 9 months’ worth of living expenses.  That is because the last thing you want is to borrow at a high rate (like credit card charges) for living expenses, or draw from long term investments at the wrong time.

Depending on your circumstance and lifestyle, here are some factors to take into consideration when determining how much and for how long the fund should support you –
1)  size of your household you are supporting and dependent on you;
2)  other cash that’s readily accessible, like money saved in your TFSA (tax free savings account);
3)  how much of other sourced income will be coming in, like EI (employment insurance) and short term disability benefits.

Ask yourself –
1)  am I in a high risk, vulnerable area of employment where replacement work may be difficult to come by?
2)  do I lack other sources of income during this period?
3)  do I lack other savings to access during this period?
If the answer is yes to these questions, you will need to consider a larger emergency fund.

My suggestion on how to estimate the fund amount:
– determine your basic monthly living expenses;
– multiply by the number of months you will likely need to access this fund;
– add 10% contingency to the total;
– less any liquid savings you can access;
– this will equal to the fund size you should consider setting aside for your rainy day account.

 

TFSA accumulated savings – an update

Here’s an update of my post from January 2015 on TFSA (Tax Free Savings Account) accumulation.
Since 2009, one can contribute to a TFSA and any investment income earned is tax free.

Assuming a 4% annual return, and the maximum is contributed each year at the beginning of each year, one can expect to have almost $63,000 by the end of 2017!   The magic of compounding and accumulation.

 

Year Maximum allowed Year-start balance Contribution on Jan 1st Interest    rate Interest earned Year-end balance saved
2009 5,000.00 0.00 5,000.00 4.0% 200.00 5,200.00
2010 5,000.00 5,200.00 5,000.00 4.0% 408.00 10,608.00
2011 5,000.00 10,608.00 5,000.00 4.0% 624.32 16,232.32
2012 5,000.00 16,232.32 5,000.00 4.0% 849.29 22,081.61
2013 5,500.00 22,081.61 5,500.00 4.0% 1,103.26 28,684.88
2014 5,500.00 28,684.88 5,500.00 4.0% 1,367.40 35,552.27
2015 10,000.00 35,552.27 10,000.00 4.0% 1,822.09 47,374.36
2016 5,500.00 47,374.36 5,500.00 4.0% 2,114.97 54,989.34
2017 5,500.00 54,989.34 5,500.00 4.0% 2,419.57 62,908.91

CPABC’s RRSP tips for 2016 tax year

As a public service, CPABC is providing resources to assist individuals and businesses prepare their income tax returns, invest in RRSPs, and plan their finances. CPABC’s RRSP and tax tips for the 2016 tax year include important information pertaining to income, deductions, and tax credits.

Here’s the link on everything RRSP: www.rrspandtaxtips.com

contribute to SPP

spplogo

Yes you can, contribute to a SPP with your RRSP room!

Did you know that you can contribute to a Saskatchewan Pension Plan (SPP) even if you don’t live in Saskatchewan?   Yes (Canadian) folks, this is absolutely true.

Why SPP?

I like this plan because:
1)  it is easy to join;
2)  it is easy to contribute –
– annual maximum contribution is $2,500, which you can opt for monthly contributions using your credit card, and
– an annual additional transfer-in from an existing RRSP of up to $10,000;
3)  their management expense at .96% for their balanced fund is decent and lower than most managed mutual funds;
4)  their balanced fund return is decent.   Average return over the 30-year period since inception is 8.1%, with a respectable 5-year average of 7.6%.  Check out the full history here.   (Of course, you need to keep in mind that these rates are not guaranteed going forward.   They just show the plan’s past performance in investment returns.)

So give the SPP some serious consideration, especially if you are considering long term retirement investing.

And happy 2017 planning!

It’s time for a year-end tax planning check-up

It’s amazing how time flies, but we’re almost near the end of another year.   And before we start to celebrate another festive season, let’s review some essential planning items and act now for some additional tax saving for 2016.

  • Harvesting tax losses.   Consider selling investment losers in your non registered portfolios to use as offsets to your capital gains.   Any unused losses for the current tax year can also be carried back three years and forward indefinitely.
  • Good to hold off buying any mutual funds until the new year.   This will avoid any possible surprising and unanticipated income distribution even if you owned the funds for a month or less.
  • Pay these bills before the year-end for 2016 tax benefits/credits –
    medical and dental expenses;
    child care expenses;
    spousal support payment;
    political donations;
    charitable donations;
    investment counsel fees.
  • For self employed taxpayers, consider making your intended capital item purchases (such as an automobile) before year-end to maximize your 2016 capital cost allowance.  You are entitled to claim the maximum business deductions for the year even though you actually only owned the item(s) for a month or less.
  • This is the time to see if it makes sense to contribute to your RRSP for the current year.   You probably know how much income you’ve earned for 2016, and whether a contribution will benefit you in tax savings for the year.
  • Adjust your 4th quarter tax instalment to compensate for possible 2016 over or under payment.
  • It’s always wise to contribute to your TFSA if there’s excess cash for savings and investments.   Doing so in your TFSA will help you avoid taxation on any investment income generated from those contributions.
  • The Home Renovations Tax Credit for seniors and persons with disabilities is still available for eligible individuals.   It’s worth 10% of eligible renovation costs to a maximum of $1,000 in tax credit.    All documentation must be available on request to support the claim.  Details available on the BC Government website.  (* please also see my blog of 2017/02/26 for the Feds’ version of this tax credit.)

And new in the CRA pipeline –

  • Disposition of your Principal Residence – new reporting rules for 2016 and beyond.   Individuals must now report their principal residence disposition occurring in the year.  CRA has published new guidance on its website for compliance and essential reporting.

Deadlines –

  • 2016 personal tax filing – May 1, 2017
  • 2016 personal tax filing with self employment reporting – June 15, 2017
  • RRSP contribution deadline for 2016 – February 28, 2017

 

CRA says – be wary of scammers!

CPABC says:

“Highly skilled scammers are impersonating the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) through telephone calls, mail, text messages, and emails.  If you want to confirm the authenticity of any CRA communication, call your local CRA office.  For information on scams or to report deceptive telemarketing, contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (CAFC) online or call 1-888-495-8501.”

Canadian Tax Myths and Tips

Canadian tax filings can be daunting.   Here are a few articles to help you through the process this season that I think is worth your read.  The first two from CBC News and the 3rd from a recent blog post from the Women’s Financial Learning Centre. –

  1. www.cbc.ca/news/business/taxes/10-tax-filing-myths-that-could-cost-you-money-1.1266240
  2. www.cbc.ca/news/business/taxes/tax-season-2015-10-ways-to-attract-a-cra-auditor-s-attention-1.2969196
  3. www.womensfinanciallearning.ca/2016/03/09/5-tax-filing-tips-to-save-you-time-and-money/#more-1802

 

 

It’s RRSP Time Again!

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Needless to say, it’s that time of the year again when some of us are scrounging for money and time to invest to our Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP).

If you’re a procrastinator and haven’t got around to contributing yet, here are a few things to keep in mind.

• Deadline for this year is 11:59pm Monday, February 29, 2016.

• If you have high income in 2015 and projected low income for 2016, you may want to use RRSP contributions (2015)/withdrawals (2016) to equalize your income of both years to save on the overall income taxes for the combined two years.

• Contribute to a spousal RRSP if you’re the high income earner in the household. This will enable you the tax deductions and equalize both your retirement income down the road on retirement.

• If you have no or low income in 2015, you probably want to skip the contribution altogether for this year. This is especially applicable if you anticipate higher income years in the near future which can benefit more from your contributions then.

• Do not exceed your RRSP contribution limit. Check your Notice of Assessment for the maximum amount you’re allowed. There’s a maximum over-contribution limit of $2,000 and going over will end up attracting a steep penalty.

Other considerations

• Don’t rush into the wrong investments when you make your RRSP contributions. Temporarily park your contributions into a cash account within your plan. Take your time and make your investment decision later when you’ve done your due diligence.

• Consider appointing a beneficiary.

• Keep in mind any RRSP withdrawals are taxable in the year of withdrawal.

• Keep in mind any spousal RRSP withdrawals may be taxable by the higher income earner if the rules are not followed. Consult with your advisor before making this move.

• You can still make contributions to a spousal RRSP after you turned 71 if you have the room, providing your spouse is not yet 71.

• And remember your RRSP is, first and foremost, savings for your retirement. Do not use it as a short term savings vehicle.

2015 year-end tax saving tips

cutting taxes

 

 

 

Tax rules are getting more complex and cumbersome. That’s why it is important to spend time and make an effort to legally maximize your personal tax deductions and minimize your taxes.

Prior to year-end is a good time to do just that. It’s your opportunity to take advantage of available deductions before they expire or become unavailable for the current year.
For 2015, here are some common tax saving reminders …
1) Paying tax deductible expenses
these deductions are only available when they are paid. Tax deductible alimony payments, child care expenses, investment counsel fees and interest on borrowings for investing or business purpose are common deductible expenses.

2) Paying for items that qualify for tax credits
these payments may give rise to refundable/non-refundable tax credits but only if they are paid within the calendar year. Items include dental and medical expenses, charitable donations, political contributions, children’s fitness and arts program fees, tuition fees, student loan interest and monthly transit passes.

3) Review non registered investment portfolios to crystallize your losses
here’s an opportunity to rid your unwanted losing investments and lock in their losses to offset your other capital gains. These losses can be applied against 2015 as well as available for carry back to any or all of the previous 3 years. All trades must be settled by Dec 24, 2015 for Canadian exchanges and Dec 28, 2015 for the US exchanges. Check for potentially different trade dates for mutual fund dispositions. (Caution – watch out for superficial loss rule which will nullify your losses for tax purpose.)

4) RRSP contributions
you have until February 29, 2016 to contribute to your RRSP or spousal RRSP to qualify for 2015 deductions. If you are turning (or have turned) 71 this year, December 31, 2015 is your deadline for one final contribution to your RRSP.

 

Some 2015 changes in tax rules:
– Indexing of adoption tax credit of $15,000.
– Child care deduction increases to $8,000 for children under 7, $5,000 for children 7 to 16, and $11,000 for children eligible for the disability tax credit
– Child fitness tax credit will be a refundable tax credit starting in 2015.
– A non-refundable Home Accessibility Tax Credit of up to $10,000 will be available in 2016 for expenditures made in 2015. This is available to seniors and persons eligible for the disability tax credit.
– Enhancement of the Universal Childcare Benefit program. The amount has been increased by $60 a month and is taxable to the lower income spouse. At the same time, the children’s credit of $2,255 a year, has been eliminated.