2015 year-end tax saving tips

cutting taxes

 

 

 

Tax rules are getting more complex and cumbersome. That’s why it is important to spend time and make an effort to legally maximize your personal tax deductions and minimize your taxes.

Prior to year-end is a good time to do just that. It’s your opportunity to take advantage of available deductions before they expire or become unavailable for the current year.
For 2015, here are some common tax saving reminders …
1) Paying tax deductible expenses
these deductions are only available when they are paid. Tax deductible alimony payments, child care expenses, investment counsel fees and interest on borrowings for investing or business purpose are common deductible expenses.

2) Paying for items that qualify for tax credits
these payments may give rise to refundable/non-refundable tax credits but only if they are paid within the calendar year. Items include dental and medical expenses, charitable donations, political contributions, children’s fitness and arts program fees, tuition fees, student loan interest and monthly transit passes.

3) Review non registered investment portfolios to crystallize your losses
here’s an opportunity to rid your unwanted losing investments and lock in their losses to offset your other capital gains. These losses can be applied against 2015 as well as available for carry back to any or all of the previous 3 years. All trades must be settled by Dec 24, 2015 for Canadian exchanges and Dec 28, 2015 for the US exchanges. Check for potentially different trade dates for mutual fund dispositions. (Caution – watch out for superficial loss rule which will nullify your losses for tax purpose.)

4) RRSP contributions
you have until February 29, 2016 to contribute to your RRSP or spousal RRSP to qualify for 2015 deductions. If you are turning (or have turned) 71 this year, December 31, 2015 is your deadline for one final contribution to your RRSP.

 

Some 2015 changes in tax rules:
– Indexing of adoption tax credit of $15,000.
– Child care deduction increases to $8,000 for children under 7, $5,000 for children 7 to 16, and $11,000 for children eligible for the disability tax credit
– Child fitness tax credit will be a refundable tax credit starting in 2015.
– A non-refundable Home Accessibility Tax Credit of up to $10,000 will be available in 2016 for expenditures made in 2015. This is available to seniors and persons eligible for the disability tax credit.
– Enhancement of the Universal Childcare Benefit program. The amount has been increased by $60 a month and is taxable to the lower income spouse. At the same time, the children’s credit of $2,255 a year, has been eliminated.