Beware of CRA scams!

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has posted some warnings on scams whereby thousands of unsuspecting Canadians have fallen prey to and lost millions of dollars to scammers.

Check out the government’s website for more information and how to protect yourself – click here. Here are some important points mentioned by CRA on its website –

1) By phone, CRA will never

  • ask for information about your passport, health card, or driver’s license
  • demand immediate payment by Interac e-transfer, bitcoin, prepaid credit cards or gift cards from retailers such as iTunes, Amazon, or others
  • use aggressive language or threaten you with arrest or sending the police
  • leave voicemails that are threatening or give personal or financial information

2) By email, CRA will never

  • give or ask for personal or financial information by email and ask you to click on a link
  • email you a link asking you to fill in an online form with personal or financial details
  • send you an email with a link to your refund
  • demand immediate payment by Interac e-transfer, bitcoin, prepaid credit cards or gift cards from retailers such as iTunes, Amazon, or others
  • threaten you with arrest or a prison sentence

3) By mail, CRA will never

  • set up a meeting with you in a public place to take a payment
  • demand immediate payment by Interac e-transfer, bitcoin, prepaid credit cards or gift cards from retailers such as iTunes, Amazon, or others
  • threaten you with arrest or a prison sentence

4) CRA never uses text messages or instant messaging such as Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to communicate with taxpayers under any circumstance. If a taxpayer receives text or instant messages claiming to be from the CRA, they are scams!

5) Other useful information on scammers posing as CRA employees. Check out this CRA’s website link – click here.

TFSA accumulated savings, RRSP and tax tips – 2019 update

Here’s another update of my previous posts on TFSA (Tax Free Savings Account) accumulation.
Since 2009, one can contribute to a TFSA and any investment income earned is tax free.

I’ve dropped the assumed annual return from 4%  to a conservative 3% due to recent decline and uncertainty in the markets.  Even with this reduced drop over the plan’s life-to-date, and assuming the maximum is contributed each year at the beginning of each year, one can still expect to have over $75,000 by the end of 2019! The magic of compounding and accumulation.

Here’s the link – 2019Jan-TFSA savings accumulation

Chartered Professional Accountants of BC (CPABC) is committed to providing resources to assist individuals and businesses prepare their income tax returns, invest in RRSPs, and plan their finances.   As a service to the public, here’s the link to its latest RRSP and other useful tax tips.